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Heavy seas
Posted by: Gregory (IP Logged)
Date: September 7, 2017 01:33AM
Category:

I was wondering if anyone has any experience sailing their Falmouth Cutters in any large seas in open ocean and how she performed? I have just started sailing mine this summer and have only experienced four to six foot seas but would like to venture much farther and really curious if anyone has personal experience in much larger and if you have any recommendations?

Greg
FC #25
Carpe Diem

Re: Heavy seas
Posted by: barefootnavigator (IP Logged)
Date: September 8, 2017 12:22AM
Category:

Yes and no, I have experienced very rough conditions in both the Straits of Juan De Fuca and Georgia. Lots of wind large short period swells. it was both beautiful and frightening. As you start to top upper 3o's of wind she starts to loose the battle. They wont sail even reasonably to weather in 40 sustained. off the wind they are fine in those condition but can roll miserably like most if not all boats. Its very important to understand the limitations of your vessel. Id sail my boat just about anywhere but still, you just cant develop the power to drive these little boats. Fyi the second you start to think you are loosing steerage off the wind heave to, you have already waited too long smiling smiley

s/v Sookie
FC #26
www.artofhookie.org

Re: Heavy seas
Posted by: Gregory (IP Logged)
Date: September 8, 2017 12:33PM
Category:

Thanks for the response, very helpful. I was wondering what your typical sail arrangement is when hove to in 30 plus wind conditions? Do you use parachord on the tiller to lash it to leeward? How well does she behave?

Greg
FC #25
Carpe Diem

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Re: Heavy seas
Posted by: barefootnavigator (IP Logged)
Date: September 8, 2017 04:27PM
Category:

I've only ever done it on my FC for fun, theory and practice but she rides beautifully and instantly under main alone. It's just as easy with a small jib. Because I live in an inland sea there are always hurricane holes to pull into so I would never need or want to heave to other than for sail changes or lunch. Everywhere you go here is a lee shore so heaving is a short term thing. Get out and play with your boat. While they will never live up to the repution they have been given the FC is truly one of the finest boats on the planet.

s/v Sookie
FC #26
www.artofhookie.org

Re: Heavy seas
Posted by: Gregory (IP Logged)
Date: September 9, 2017 02:16AM
Category:

I can agree with you on all accounts, especially the quality of construction, design by Mr. Hess, and pure beauty these cutters posess! Just last week we got the leftovers of Harvey here in NJ and were on a reach in about 20 knots steady with Yankee only when we got hit with about a 50 knot microburst broadside, I jammed the tiller to leeward instantly and my FC was buried up to the side of the cabin in the wash, with water almost swallowing the port side of the cockpit. My wife and son slid down the seat with the look of Quint at the end of Jaws as the shark is chomping, but I had no worries, knowing that she would pop right back up as we came into the wind, and she did. Next day we saw a steady 35 knots with gusts to 40, and rode it downwind in about five foot whitecaps, with the rolling, but we were pleasantly comfortable as we settled in, and slightly quartered off the wind to ease her motion. As we surfed down the following seas I could feel all that extra lift and buoyancy Mr. Hess sculpted into the aft end with the wineglass transom and the reverse curves, and steering was never even affected because that glorious rudder sits so deep! What a masterpiece! I have hove to with main alone in about 20 knots and can agree that she stalls instantly, and I will experiment in stronger conditions. Thanks for the info.

Greg
FC #25
Carpe Diem



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